Social Acts of Prevention

About Social Acts Prevention

WHAT ARE "SOCIAL ACTS" OF PREVENTION?
We ALL are called to be compassionate and evangelical to those who are, lost, hurting, or in crisis. (ref. Matthew 28:19,20). 'Social Acts" of Prevention should be explored in settings, such as schools, workplaces, faith-based places, families, and neighborhoods, in which social relationships occur and seeks to identify the characteristics of these settings that are associated with becoming victims or perpetrators of violence. Prevention strategies at this level focus on improving the physical and social environment in these settings to create safe places where people live, learn, work, and play) and by addressing other conditions that give rise to violence in communities.

WHO IS CONSIDERED AS A SOCIAL ACTIVIST?
An activist is a person who works to change a community, aiming to make it a better place. To be a strong effective leader or activist, a person should be able to lead others, be dedicated to a cause and be able to convince or influence others in a community to believe in the cause. Broad societal factors that help create a climate in which violence is encouraged or inhibited. These factors include social and cultural norms that support violence as an acceptable way to resolve conflicts. Other large societal factors include the health, economic, educational, and social policies that help to maintain economic or social inequalities between groups in society. Prevention strategies at this level include efforts to promote societal norms that protect against violence as well as efforts to strengthen household financial security, education and employment opportunities, and other policies that affect the structural determinants of health.


THE ROLE, MEANING, AND PURPOSE OF EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES TRAINING

WHAT IS EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES (EBP)

EBP refers to using the best available evidence for decision-making and providing efficient and effective care. Evidence-based practice is a conscientious, problem-solving approach to clinical or faith-based practice that incorporates the best evidence from well-designed studies, patient/client values and preferences, and a Practitioner's expertise in making decisions about a patient's care. It is a method by which Practitioners across the healthcare and faith-based professions review and assess the most current, highest-quality research to inform their delivery of care. Although there is no precise standard for what constitutes evidence-based practice in specialty training, the approach consists of three main components and five basic steps.

1

Best External Evidence

Evaluate and implement the most current, clinically or faith-based soul-care centered relevant, and scientifically sound research.

2

Individual Clinical or Faith-Based/Spiritual Expertise

Draw on your personal experience of what has worked and not worked in your clinical or faith-based/spiritual practice.

3

Client/Patient Values and Expectations

Consider and value the preferences of your individual client/patients. Levels of evidence in both healthcare and/or faith-based/spiritual expertise research can be grouped into four categories according to how credible the information is. These four categories, ranging from the most credible to the least includes.

  • Randomized controlled trials
  • Evidence from cohort, case-control, or observational studies
  • Expert opinions that are supported by experience, studies, or reports.
  • Personal experience (clinical or faith-based/spiritual expertise

LLU uses various parts of a series of Evidence-Based Practices Study Manuals or KITs created by the Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health, and Human Services.

4

Benefits Of Offering Evidence-Based Studies

Evidence-based practices have proven to lead to better service to patients/clients, equip specialty services providers, and institutional educational outcomes. Build more quality care teams and implement impactful study modules that are state-wide acceptable for most workplace required credentials, possible college prerequisite studies credits approval and clergy best practices.

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